Tue 01 Nov 2016 View all news articles

Presenting a property to be let

It is quite common for landlords to overlook the basics before letting a property, especially for the first time. The level to which a rental property is presented sets a benchmark for the tenants to upkeep it.

Here you will find some common areas that should be attended to prior to placing your property on the market.

Interior & decoration
Not all tenants like Magnolia! However, it is a good idea to keep the colour schemes neutral, rather than go for bold colours. Although tenants cannot redecorate without the permission of the landlord, they are expected not to let the decor deteriorate and therefore, if the tenant has been in the property for a couple of years, the decoration would need to be “freshened up”. And if the colour is no longer available or is a special colour (not premixed), then this could be hard to match and result in the whole room being redecorated instead of say, just one wall.

It is also worth noting, busy wall paper should also be avoided, for many reasons. One being if the paper becomes damaged, however small, you are looking at re-papering a whole wall. The cost you may find hard to justify if only a small area has been damaged.

The above mainly applies to investment properties, as landlords may have different thoughts if they let their family home for a set tenancy length. Going away for say 12 months, knowing you are almost definitely going to return, would not warrant neutralising your house to suit tenants for such a small timescale.

When a property has been let out for a number of years, to several tenants, due to general wear & tear, it is hard to lay blame with a particular tenant for the general deterioration that has occurred. It is therefore good budgeting practice to re-decorate the property and freshen it up, at least every three to four years. If, of course a tenant has clearly damaged the wall coverings, or has painted walls, but not to a particularly high standard, then this can be classed as unfair wear and tear and can be deducted from the deposit.

Exterior
Tenants do not want to see overgrown or unkempt gardens, rickety old sheds or rusty barbeques. A neat and tidy garden which the tenant can use with friends & family over the summer months, would always appeal.

If you have an overgrown garden at the beginning, which path & patios that need weeding, you cannot expect a tenant to lovingly maintain it during their occupation.

Also remember your property is your main asset, and therefore routine maintenance should be done to ensure that your property remains in good condition. It is no good having rotten windows or a leaking roof and expect to obtain high rental yield.

There are a lot of home improvement & green deal grants still available at present, so if your rental property needs any major improvement, be sure to research the internet first. Things like replacing your old wooden windows with uPVC, to ensure good thermal insulating in the property is a very wise move, to avoid any empty periods between tenancies.

If you would like any further advice on any of the above, please contact our helpful team.

As leading Wirral estate agents and lettings agents we have plenty to talk about and like to give our opinions on a few things too! Read about what we have to say, our latest news and industry news.